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Workers’ comp and nerve injuries from power tools

| Apr 13, 2021 | Workers' Compensation |

Injuries that give rise to Kentucky workers’ compensation claims are varied in their nature and scope. They include what can be serious nerve injuries caused by the use of power tools. One type of this kind of power tool nerve damage injury is known as vibration white finger.

What is vibration white finger?

Vibration white finger or VWF is a long-term condition that stems from use of vibrating power tools over the course of a prolonged period of time. VWF results in a person suffering from tingling or numbness of fingertips. Fingertips also experience what is known as blanching and become white in their appearance. There is no known cure for VWF. However, VWF is a preventable condition. VWF can form the basis of a workers’ compensation claim in Kentucky.

Symptoms of advanced VWF

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VWF can advance and become a more significant physical issue over time. Ongoing exposure to vibrating tools in the workplace can affect other parts of a worker’s body. These include bones, joints, muscles and the nervous system. When this occurs, it medically is known as hand-arm vibration syndrome.

Development of Raynaud’s phenomenon

Ultimately, the possibility exists that VWF can degrade a worker’s health further still. A worker can develop reduced blood flow to the fingers. This is known as Raynaud’s phenomenon, and it is sometimes referred to as Raynaud’s syndrome.

If you’ve suffered VWF or some other work-related injury, you may be entitled for relief via workers’ compensation. You can best protect your vital legal rights when making a workers’ compensation claim by retaining the services of a skilled and experienced attorney at Robinson Salyers, PLLC.

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